Deciding if you are a candidate for sacrocolpopexy to treat pelvic organ prolapse

Posted by Dr. Diane Hartman on June 29, 2016 at 6:22 PM

Pelvic organ prolapse is not uncommon—some estimates say that 3.3 million women in the U.S. have it in some form.

For many of those women, physical therapy will ease minor symptoms. For others, particularly those who come in and say, ‘my doctor told me I have this . . .’ and they have no symptoms, I suggest taking a wait-and-see approach because the condition is not dangerous to a woman’s health. But symptoms can worsen, and when that happens, we can discuss treatment.

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Tags: sacrocolpopexy, robotic sacrocolpopexy

What is the difference between laparoscopic and robotic sacrocolpopexy?

Posted by Foothills Urology on May 11, 2016 at 5:16 PM

As many as 1 in 10 women may develop pelvic organ prolapse. Of those, about 10 percent will need surgery, called sacrocolpopexy or sacral colpopexy, to repair pelvic organ prolapse. One of the questions women often ask me is what is the best approach to these repairs and what is the difference between robotic sacrocolpopexy and laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy

I find this question refreshing and sophisticated because it shows that women are doing their homework and becoming active in making decisions over their own health rather than just following doctor’s orders. Here are the three main things you should know about the difference in these two types of prolapse surgery:

  1. These are two similar approaches to the same surgery.
  2. Both are minimally invasive, which means surgery is performed through several small incisions rather than one large abdominal incision.
  3. While most urology and gynecology surgeons now perform laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy, only a few are trained and offer robotic sacrocolpopexy. It’s important that if you choose this option that you find a surgeon who has completed a fair number of these surgeries and does this surgery routinely.
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Tags: sacrocolpopexy, robotic sacrocolpopexy, pelvic prolapse